History

Overview

History

WEAVE was established in 1978 as a private 501(c)3 nonprofit organization to serve domestic violence survivors and their families in Sacramento County. In 1988, WEAVE added services to help survivors of sexual assault and remains the sole Rape Crisis Center in Sacramento County. In 2009, WEAVE became part of the local Rescue & Restore Coalition and began providing services to domestic and international victims of human trafficking. Today WEAVE implements a continuum of crisis intervention, therapeutic and prevention services to meet the unique needs of survivors, their families, and the community. WEAVE’s services include a 24-hour Support & Information Line, confidential emergency Safehouse, walk-in Triage services including a lethality assessment, therapeutic counseling services, legal advocacy, and youth and community prevention education programs.

The organization has grown from a small, grassroots organization to a nationally recognized agency. WEAVE has been honored for its efforts by many organizations, including the Nonprofit Resource Center, the U.S. Department of Justice, the Governor of California, the Human Rights Fair Housing Commission, the Attorney General and the President of the United States. In 2011, WEAVE was awarded the FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award - one of only a handful of Northern California recipients in the award’s history.

 

WEAVE Timeline

1975

  • A community action group comprised of abused Hispanic women established WEAVE to address the issues of domestic violence in their community.

1978

  • The first WEAVE shelter opened with funding from the County of Sacramento.
  • The abuser treatment program known as Positive Anger Control (PAC) was established
  • WEAVE was incorporated.

1979

  • Federal funding allowed WEAVE to expand services to include a Shelter Children’s Program.

1981

  • WEAVE expanded services to offer legal advocacy
  • The Young Lawyers Association of Sacramento gave WEAVE their Law Day Award in recognition   of outstanding legal advocacy services for abused women and their children
  • WEAVE became the sole provider of domestic violence services in Sacramento County. At this time, the Resource Development Committee of the Board of Directors was formed and staff was hired to broaden and stabilize WEAVE’s local base of financial support.

1982

  • Aetna Life and Casualty Foundation funded the WEAVE Tutorial Project for shelter children
  • WEAVE received an award from the Public Relations Round Table for outstanding achievement in public relations.

1984

  • The Ms. Foundation for Women funded the WEAVE Teen Dating Violence Project. Teen dating violence research conducted by WEAVE staff was published in the National Journal of Social Work.

1985

  • The nine Soroptimist International clubs in Sacramento joined together to form the Soroptimist Joint Committee to support construction of a permanent shelter facility.

1986

  • The WEAVE Soroptimist Safehouse opened—the first shelter to be built in California especially for the victims of domestic violence.
  • WEAVE became a full member agency of the Sacramento United Way.
  • WEAVE received the Human Rights Fair Housing Commission Award for outstanding advocacy on behalf of the rights of battered women.

1987

  • WEAVE established the Domestic Violence Coordination Council—a group comprised of elected public officials, representatives from law enforcement, and victim advocacy agencies to coordinate and improve services to victims of family violence.

1988

  • WEAVE expanded services to include victims of sexual assault.
  • WEAVE received an award from the Attorney General for outstanding support of law   enforcement and service to battered women.
  • WEAVE received the Governor’s Victim Services Award.

1989

  • WEAVE formed its Sexual Assault Response Team (SART).
  • A Safehouse addition was completed allowing room for the addition of on-site medical services.
  • WEAVE published Everybody’s Business—a manual for replication of the Domestic Violence Coordination Council in other communities.

1990

  • First annual domestic violence law enforcement recognition event was held

1992

  • Dedication of WEAVE’s multi-service Children’s Center (March 19).
  • Dedication of WEAVE’s Children’s Playground at the Safehouse (September).

1993

  • Established elementary school-based prevention education program.

1994

  • Dedication of B.T. Collins Memorial Counseling Center.

1995

  • Established high school-based prevention education program.
  • Established domestic violence Counseling Center services for children and elementary school violence prevention programs.

1996

  • Ten year anniversary of the WEAVE Soroptimist Safehouse.
  • President Bill Clinton paid a visit to WEAVE and spoke to a group of 5,000 about issues associated with domestic violence (July 23).

1997

  • WEAVE is given Sacramento-El Dorado Medical Society Medical Community Service Award.

1998

  • WEAVE Works retail opens
  • California Endowment grant funds “Break the Silence on Domestic Violence” a two year, six    county multimedia domestic violence prevention campaign in collaboration with KVIE public TV.
  • Establishment of WEAVE’s endowment with a $100,000 donation to ensure the continuation of domestic violence and rape crisis services.
  • WEAVE’s 20 Year Anniversary.

1999

  • Suited for Success program established, helping women get a fresh start or to re-enter the workforce.

2000

  • WEAVE Thrift Shop retail operation opens in Carmichael.

2001

  • WEAVE legacy Gail Jones retires.

2002

  • Nicolette Bautista joins WEAVE as Executive Director.

2003

  • WEAVE celebrates 25 years of service.

2005

  • Nonprofit of the Year award from the Nonprofit Resource Center.

2006

  • Beth Hassett named WEAVE’s Executive Director
  • WEAVE Founders awarded prestigious Minerva Award.

2007

  • Counseling services expanded to outlying communities.

2008

  • Opened onsite charter school at Safehouse campus.
  • WEAVE launches “Stylin’ for Success”, a domestic violence awareness campaign aimed at salon professionals.  The campaign was chosen for replication by the CA Attorney General’s Office.

2009

  • Opened new 12,000 square foot Safehouse featuring 18 family suites and onsite supportive services at Safehouse campus.
  • WEAVE became part of the local Rescue & Restore Coalition and began providing services to victims of human trafficking.
  • WEAVE, in partnership with the Sacramento Police Department and Runyon Saltzman & Einhorn, launch “Keep Your Wits” as multi-media campaign aimed at encouraging bystander intervention and knowledge of personal safety. The campaign targeted teens and young adults through social media content and radio and TV PSAs.

2010

  • Added Nature Explore Classroom to Safehouse campus.
  • Chosen to implement the programmatic component of a CDC funded evaluation effort of the Coaching Boys Into Men prevention education program.

2011

  • WEAVE opened WEAVE Wellness Center to better serve residents of South Sacramento and Elk Grove.
  • WEAVE awarded the FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award.

2012

  • Completed renovations to Children’s Services Building at Safehouse campus, adding expanded resources for children’s counseling, play care, and onsite charter school.
  • Completed construction of Next Step Housing Village to provide longer term housing solutions to families graduating from Safehouse program.
  • Launched My Strength Clubs at area high schools

2013

  • Opens four transitional housing cottages to provide safe housing for survivors who have completed the Safehouse program.
  • Secured third grant of $1 million from the Emergency Housing Assistance Program to fund the purchase of eight apartments which will be renovated to provide alternative emergency shelter options for victims with unique barriers such as service animals.
  • In partnership with Elk Grove Police Department, reestablished the Domestic Violence Response Team to serve victims of domestic violence and elder abuse living in Elk Grove.
  • Received funding from Blue Shield of California Foundation to launch the Shared Vision collaborative with the Sacramento Native American Health Center to develop an integrated approach to domestic violence screening and response in the community clinic setting.
  • Launched WEAVE Legal – an innovative “low bono” legal assistance program meeting the legal barriers experienced by most domestic violence victims.

 

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